A clean slate

Starting a project is the best, isn’t it? Almost as great as finishing a project…. almost. So, here goes!

I have a local weaver’s guild near me, which is an amazing group of talented weavers and artists! The group has decided to work on a coverlet project together. A coverlet is like a bedspread. We have 12 weavers participating in the project. Each weaver selects a color. I selected an apple green. (The color in the picture isn’t quite right, but you’ll see plenty of other photos to get the idea!)

My coverlet color

The background color is a natural.

Background color

So, when my coverlet is finished it will be entirely apple green with a neutral-colored background. Now comes the fun part! Each weaver also selects a pattern. In this case, we are all using overshot – which is a style of weaving. (When you think of old, colonial blankets, this is the style!) I selected a pattern from Davison’s A Handweaver’s Pattern Book (this is an amazing book for anyone who’s into overshot! All 2 of you!).

A Classic Weaving Book!

I chose “Johann D’s Design No. 2”. I have no idea what or who the reference is to, but I think it’s awesome!

My coverlet pattern

So, this is how it’s supposed to work. (Keep in mind, this is still theoretical since we aren’t finished yet!) Each weaver will set up the loom for their pattern and weave (12) squares. We have all exchanged yarn with each other. So, I’ll weave my square in apple green, and weave Margaret’s square in gold, and Lisa’s in purple, and so on. When we are done weaving, we will cut the squares apart and hand them back to the owners. So, I should end up with (12) apple green squares, all in different patterns! Then, it’s up to each person to sew them together into the final coverlet form! On paper, it’s brilliant! (Keep your fingers crossed that it works out that way!)

I began at the warping board, measuring the background yarn. It doesn’t look that glamorous since it’s all one color. But, that’s part of the overshot charm!

On the warping board

Coming around the peg

The warping board is a great tool to ensure all the yarns are the same length and in the right order! The order isn’t as critical in this case, since the yarn is all the same. Weavers use a “cross” somewhere on the warping board to keep everyone in line!

The cross at the top

For this project, I have 380 yarns to measure out. So, there has to be tricks for counting or I lose track after about 13! I incorporate a long string that changes location every group of 20.

Lots of counting!

When the yarn is ready to come off the warping board, I use a little twist to keep everything together. I’ve seen other weavers do twists and mine is certainly not as beautiful. But, it does the trick!

Twisting the yarn off

Next up, the yarn will go into the reed! Can’t wait! Until next time…

0 thoughts on “A clean slate

  1. I love that pattern! I used it to make a table cloth for my mom and it came out beautiful! Can’t wait to see your weaving progressing. It’s interesting how the same pattern can look different with different yarn or just different color. And I agree with you – the best part of weaving is the start. It’s exciting and mysterious. 🙂

    • That’s so cool! I would love to see a picture of mom’s table cloth! It is great fun to see how the same pattern can look completely different, depending on the scale, color and yarn! Thanks for the comment!

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