Golden girl

Hmm… maybe for this project all the titles will need to start with a variation on the word, “gold”… I’m up for suggestions!

The starting peg!

The starting peg!

When we last chatted, I was busy measuring yarn for the project on the warping board. Because not all the yarns will fit in one fell swoop, I divided the project into two. This is the second half!

The ending peg!

The ending peg!

You’ll notice that at the beginning and ending pegs, the yarn either wraps around and keeps going, or it is cut and knotted. Typically, I’ll cut and knot when I need to change colors, or I’ve run out of yarn and need to start a new cone. You want to avoid knots in the middle at all costs – it means knots in the middle of your weaving! (Gasp!) Knots can be at the beginning or the end. If you end up with one in the middle, you typically have to do some creative problem solving to hide it! And that’s hardly ever fun…

Somewhere-in-between peg!

Somewhere-in-between peg!

Twisting it off the warping board

Twisting it off the warping board

I do a little twisty action to take the project off the warping board and transport it to the table. Because I have 2 sections, it usually takes me a minute to figure out which one goes where! You want them in order – always!

Moving the show to the table!

Moving the show to the table!

So, we’re ready to sley! Yay! Here’s the list of items I recommend – a reed (I’m using an 8 dent), lease sticks (simple, but awesome!), pair of scissors and a measuring tape.

Meet the sleying players!

Meet the sleying players!

The lease sticks are just (2) sticks with holes in the end where you can tie them together. Their incredible destiny is to be in charge of keeping the project yarns in order – no small task! So, I’m sliding the (2) sticks through the yarn where I’ve marked the cross and then, tying the ends. This will give me a fighting chance at figuring out which yarn comes first, or second, or forty-second… You get the idea!

Sliding the lease sticks in

Sliding the lease sticks in

Through the cross!

Through the cross!

(The yarn on the outside is always first up. So, as I pull the yarn out of the bunch and thread it through the reed, I can tell what’s next by the new yarn on the outside! Sounds sort of complicated, I know. May need to do a video at some point to explain it clearer!)

Close-up!

Close-up!

Lock it in!

Lock it in!

The sleying has begun!!! Next up, I’ll finish assigning everyone a slot in the reed and move the fun to the loom! We’re getting down to business now! Talk to you soon…

Run 13 Sleying 7

4 thoughts on “Golden girl

  1. Do you prop the reed up or are you pulling the yarns through? And what kind of yarn, please! I’m fascinated by your blog posts!

    • Hi Laura! Thank you for the comment! I lay it on the table so a small portion hangs off the edge. My original weaving teacher always had us duct tape it to the table so we didn’t accidentally flip it off! (Never a bad idea to anticipate the clumsiness!) I like to use cotton for my warps for a couple of reasons. First of all, I can get cotton in lots and lots of colors! And that really suits the way I work. Also, it’s not a huge investment! I feel like if I mess up the cotton, it’s not the end of the world. If I mess up the gorgeous bamboo or silk or alpaca sitting on my shelf, that would sting! (I typically order a carpet warp or rug warp through a place called Great Northern Weaving in Kalamazoo, MI. Their yarn is about the least expensive you’ll find!) Loved hearing from you! Thanks! chris

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