Goldenrod

The loom has rods in it and the project includes lots of gold colors… That’s the best I’ve got! I’m up for other “gold” related titles! Send me your brilliant ideas! And we’re winding, and winding, and winding,…

Trusty yard sticks!

Trusty yard sticks!

When winding the yarn around the warp beam at the back, the goal is to provide an even surface for the yarn to wrap around. I like to use yard sticks since I have a 36″ wide loom – the math makes me happy! If you don’t use something (sticks, heavy paper, etc.), the yarn will pile up on itself, creating mountains and valleys. This scenario, in turn, will alter the rate at which the yarn unwinds while weaving, causing tension problems. Yadda, yadda, yadda… bottom line is, yard sticks – good! Nothing between the layers of yarn – bad!

Smoothly winding on the back!

Smoothly winding on the back!

While I’m focused on winding the yarn onto the back, there is plenty of excitement going on at the front! I’m slowly straightening the yarns (sectioning off chunks of yarn that each get a gentle yank before they make their way through the loom) and keeping an eye on them as they travel to the back. You can see the end coming when the tips lift off the carpeting!

The view from the front

The view from the front

Once the lengths becomes very short, it’s time to knot the project onto the rod at the front! I cut out the lease sticks because it’s time to give them a rest. And then, I generally grab about an inch-ish of yarn at a time to create my knots! I’ve found it’s easiest to start in the middle. (How many times during the process have I said, “start in the middle”? Clearly, I’m a creature of habit!)

View from the front, with everything tied on!

View from the front, with everything tied on!

And closer...

And closer…

My weaving instructor taught a complicated knot for this step, which I still use! It’s very easy to undo when you are ready. But, because of the type of cotton I use, I sneak in a simple knot first, and then do the fancy one. I get nervous that the fancy one won’t hold the yarns in place. And nervous weavers are definitely something to avoid! (Ask anyone in my family…)

Closest!

Closest!

See all the lovely knots?

See all the lovely knots?

It’s time to weave!!! Woohoo!!! You’ll need a little filler to spread out the yarns before you dive right in. So, my poison of choice is toilet paper! Matter of fact, I’ve found that the cheap stuff works great! Because it is perforated, it is much easier to remove than a fat yarn or strips of fabric. And, it’s not a huge investment! A friend from the local weaver’s guild gave me a 12 or 16 roll pack once upon a time and at the rate I’m going, I’ll never use it all! So, if you live near Northwest Indiana, give me a buzz and I’ll share with you!

A little TP before we weave!

A little TP before we weave!

About 5-6 rows will do it!

About 5-6 rows will do it!

Ooooh! I love this part coming up! I’m loading up the shuttle and getting ready to let it fly! Isn’t weaving great??? Stay tuned for more fiber goodness…

Run 13 Weaving 1

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